Burial Stress

Burials being delayed as floods create dangerous conditions at graveyards

Floods in Somerset and the Thames Valley have seen funerals put on hold as wet ground is too dangerous for gravediggers

Flooded cemeteries and even those outside flooded areas where the ground is waterlogged are causing difficulties in digging graves. Photograph: Michael Scott/Demotix/Corbis
Flooded cemeteries and even those outside flooded areas where the ground is waterlogged are causing difficulties in digging graves. Photograph: Michael Scott/Demotix/Corbis

 
The flood crisis is causing further anguish for bereaved families as wet ground is making burials impossible in the worst-hit areas.
Authorities say there is little they can do about weather-related funeral delays that have been described as “absolutely abnormal”. While families face the possibility of extra distress, the floods have created dangerous conditions for gravediggers.
Crematoriums have not been immune from the issue either, with one having to close for about two months due to flooding.
Source The Guardian 18-2-12014

About Egidius Kuhlmann

Reading about peak-oil, overpopulation, “Terra Preta” and biochar in 2009 and after making batches biochar for soil improvement from garden residue, I thought, why not make biochar from corpses. Deeply worried about the unsustainable path 'we' as humanity have taken, I see a future where fossil fuels are scarce, the western economic growth model in tatters, the global temperature rises due to the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere with an growing population reaching billions more humans than is sustainable? Thinking along those paths, the question “how can we dispose so efficiently and with the least amount of energy of human remains” became the starting point.
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